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Tuesday, March 26
 

2:00pm

Session: Mapping New Vistas: Employing Emerging Technologies Into Your Visual Resource Services
ORGANIZER:
  • Jon Cartledge, Digital Imaging Specialist, Smith College

PRESENTERS:
  • Jon Cartledge, Digital Imaging Specialist, Smith College
  • Andrew Maurer, Interactive Media Coordinator, Smith College
  • Chris Strasbaugh, Digital Library Archivist and Curator, The Ohio State University

As responsibilities and needs shift for the visual resource community, finding new, relevant, technologies for art history and other humanities can be a daunting task. Presenters will discuss using different technologies to expand the meaning of visual resource classroom support and the strategic role you can play to begin being to matchmaker and mover of technology in your institution.

Jonathan Cartledge and Andrew Maurer from the Imaging Center at Smith College will share the history and results of recent pilot projects in virtual environments and ArcGIS mapping for classroom use. Visual resource projects take on new forms from StoryMap presentations to virtual exhibition halls.

Chris Strasbaugh from the Knowlton School at The Ohio State University will be talking about how he saw Virtual Reality as the next great tool for education and how he created buy-in from vendors and the faculty to imagine what is possible in the classroom with the help of ever-important student ambassadors.

Sponsors
avatar for vrcHost LLC

vrcHost LLC

We specialize in installation, integration, customization, and feature development for the Madison Digital Image Database (MDID) project - an open source digital content management system used at hundreds of institutions worldwide for teaching and scholarship in the visual arts.


Tuesday March 26, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
California Ballroom, Banquet Level DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Los Angeles Downtown, 120 S. Los Angeles St., Los Angeles, CA

2:00pm

Session: Where Is Your DAMS? Considerations From a Locally-Hosted Instance
ORGANIZER/PRESENTER:
  • Sarah Pham, Digital Assets Specialist,  Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)

This session begins with Sarah Pham (Digital Assets Specialist) from the Los Angeles County Museum of Art detailing factors in the management of a locally-hosted DAMS, including how the varying roles of stakeholders are balanced as well as the challenges influencing workflows and DAMS end users. For instance, who is best suited to interface with the software vendor? Are administrators the prime point of contact? How do they best facilitate collaboration between the vendor and IT staff while prioritizing users needs and expectations? The second part of this session will be a facilitated conversation where attendees are encouraged to participate in an informal discussion; topics can range from the challenges and highlights of working with digital assets to addressing users needs as administrators or the steps involved in implementing a DAMS. This can be an opportunity for attendees to connect with fellow practitioners to talk about where they may be with their DAMS and as a group work through some solutions or ideas to best serve users and administrative needs.

(This is an updated hybrid presentation/discussion formerly a panel comparing instances of local versus cloud-hosted DAMS.)

Tuesday March 26, 2019 2:00pm - 3:00pm
Golden State Ballroom II, Banquet Level DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Los Angeles Downtown, 120 S. Los Angeles St., Los Angeles, CA

3:15pm

Session: Lightning Talks
MODERATOR:
  • Jackie Spafford

PRESENTERS:
  • Jessica Cebra , Metadata Management Librarian, Stanford Libraries/Prelinger Library,  Artists’ books, zines, and ephemera at the Prelinger Library in San Francisco
  • Monica Kenzie, Information Resources Technical Specialist, University of Michigan, Migrating Forward
  • Adelaide McComb, Curatorial Assistant, Lakota Dream Museum, Decolonizing Museum Data
  • Jason Miller, Director, CED Visual Resources Center, UC Berkeley Environmental Design Archives, Planting Plans: combining new images, old data, and the landscape before you
  • Jeff Mixter, Software Engineer, OCLC, Sharing and Aggregating Cultural Heritage material using IIIF
  • Devon Murphy, Graduate Student, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, The Information Worlds of Art Museum Curators and Registrars
  • Julia Murphy, Digital Asset Manager, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, "Interpretative" Documentation
  • Jackie Spafford, Image Resources Curator, University of California, Santa Barbara, New Life for a Visual Resources Space


Tuesday March 26, 2019 3:15pm - 4:15pm
Golden State Ballroom I, Banquet Level DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Los Angeles Downtown, 120 S. Los Angeles St., Los Angeles, CA

4:30pm

Session: Moving/Still/Textual Pictures - Tools for Analyzing Art, Texts, and Films
MODERATOR:
  • John Hunter, Professor of Comparative Humanities, Bucknell University

PRESENTERS:
  • Sarah Eckermann, Computer Engineering student, Bucknell University
  • John Hunter, Professor of Comparative Humanities, Bucknell University
  • Bridget Madden, Associate Director, Visual Resources Center, University of Chicago
  • Gabriel Rodriguez, Digital Curator, Media Center for Art History, Columbia University
  • Stefaan Van Liefferinge, Associate Research Scholar, Media Center for Art History, Columbia University


Tuesday March 26, 2019 4:30pm - 5:45pm
Golden State Ballroom II, Banquet Level DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Los Angeles Downtown, 120 S. Los Angeles St., Los Angeles, CA

4:30pm

Session: Teaching Visual Literacy as an Evolving Discipline
ORGANIZER/MODERATOR:
  • Patricia Guardiola, Assistant Director, Fisher Fine Arts Library, University of Pennsylvania

PRESENTERS:
  • Amy Lazet, Visual Resources Specialist, College for Creative Studies
  • Meghan Rubenstein, Curator of Visual Resources, Colorado College
  • Jessica Sack, Jan and Frederick Mayer Senior Associate Curator of Public Education, Yale University Art Gallery

In 2011, the ACRL published its Visual Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education, which provide guidance in finding, using, evaluating, and making images. The years since those standards were established have been revolutionary for online images and other visual media, from increased digitization to new methods of sharing, editing, and manipulating. In a landscape where anyone can create media and metadata, we face the challenges of evaluating quality, accuracy, and authenticity while navigating information overload. This session will explore academic initiatives in visual literacy, whether integrated in the classroom, provided as tutorials, or implemented in a novel fashion. We’ll also examine popular and even controversial means of finding, sharing, and making digital media. We will pose these questions: In our current climate, what does it mean to be visually literate, and how do we assess this skill? How have visual literacy and our methods for teaching it changed in the era of fake news and doctored media? What can we do as information professionals to be both guides and innovators in the field of visual literacy instruction?

Sponsors
II

Inter-American Institute for Advanced Studies in Cultural History

The Inter-American Institute for Advanced Studies in Cultural History was organized to promote interdisciplinary research and publication by scholars working in Latin-American cultural history. The Institute sponsored several major conferences related to Latin American history and... Read More →


Tuesday March 26, 2019 4:30pm - 5:45pm
California Ballroom, Banquet Level DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Los Angeles Downtown, 120 S. Los Angeles St., Los Angeles, CA
 
Wednesday, March 27
 

10:45am

Session: Digital Scholarship and Digital Humanities
ORGANIZER/MODERATOR:
  • Brian Shelburne, Head, Digital Scholarship Center, University of Massachusetts Amherst

PRESENTERS:
  • Lavinia Ciuffa, Photographic Archive - Curator, American Academy in Rome
  • Emily Hagen, PhD Student, Department of Art History, Penn State
  • Jenni Rodda, Manager, Digital Media and Computer Services, Institute of Fine Arts/NYU

Digital Scholarship and Digital Humanities are terms that describe rapidly growing techniques and methodologies in academia. For some Visual Resources professionals, the technologies that are used in DS/DH projects are perceived as a shift away from our skillset that requires significant additional learning and resources to participate. At the heart of many projects, however, are tools and techniques that have been employed in traditional VR facilities for years. This session offers case studies of how VR professionals with a conventional VR background can contribute to DS/DH projects in a meaningful way. It also offers an example of how VR professionals with minimal knowledge can learn these tools and produce meaningful projects.

Sponsors
II

Inter-American Institute for Advanced Studies in Cultural History

The Inter-American Institute for Advanced Studies in Cultural History was organized to promote interdisciplinary research and publication by scholars working in Latin-American cultural history. The Institute sponsored several major conferences related to Latin American history and... Read More →


Wednesday March 27, 2019 10:45am - 11:45am
California Ballroom, Banquet Level DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Los Angeles Downtown, 120 S. Los Angeles St., Los Angeles, CA

10:45am

Session: Special Topics in Intellectual Property Rights: Motion Pictures, Archival Footage, and Film in Pedagogy
ORGANIZERS/MODERATORS:
  • Margaret McKee, Digital Asset Manager, The Menil Collection
  • Heather Seneff, Director, Visual Media Center, University of Denver

PRESENTER:
  • Snowden Becker, MLIS Program Director, UCLA Department of Information Studies
  • Amy Lazet, Visual Resources Specialist, College for Creative Studies
  • Claudy Op den Kamp, Senior Lecturer in Film,  Bournemouth University

As layered, collective works that bring together multiple kinds of intellectual property, films present complex rights challenges. How do commercial studios clear all the rights hurdles necessary to bring new works to the public, and how do they manage the rights for these new creations? How do film archives evaluate the copyright status of works that come into their collection, and how do they balance the interests of rights holders with their mission to preserve and provide access to these materials? How can visual resource professionals who facilitate the pedagogical use of motion pictures in teaching and student work traverse these tricky waters and evaluate when they can assert fair use with confidence? This session will examine issues specific to the use of film and new media in research, education, and creative works. Three speakers will address aspects of copyright that impact the commercial motion picture industry, film archives, and educational institutions.

Wednesday March 27, 2019 10:45am - 11:45am
Golden State Ballroom II, Banquet Level DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Los Angeles Downtown, 120 S. Los Angeles St., Los Angeles, CA

1:15pm

Session: Digital Preservation and Audio/Visual Content
ORGANIZER:
  • Joey Heinen, Digital Preservation Specialist, Los Angeles County Museum of Art

MODERATOR:
  • Krystal Boehlert, Visual Resources Specialist,  University of California Riverside

PRESENTERS:
  • Joey Heinen, Digital Preservation Specialist, Los Angeles County Museum of Art
  • Holly McGee, Digital A/V Assistant, Getty Research Institute 
  • Sadie Menchen, Digital Services Manager, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

Across the various options in Digital Asset Management Systems, there is great inconsistency in terms of their ability to faithfully preserve and provide access for A/V content. How are cultural heritage institutions grappling with these complexities and forging their own path with the systems they have in place? For this session we will hear from digital preservationists at three different institutions. Over the past year, LACMA has expanded its configuration of ResourceSpace (ODIN) to support A/V content as well as improving upon its technical and provenance metadata extraction and management to assist in obsolescence monitoring and preservation planning for its digital collections. However, this wasn’t without a high degree of trial and error, a particularly complex situation given that they are locally hosted and must share responsibilities between LACMA staff and the software developers. The Getty Research Institute has been using Rosetta to manage both preservation and access workflows for its audio-visual collection items. They will address some of the challenges faced in serving the diverse needs of their user base, the changing nature of web standards and video players, as well as the complexity of managing a service for a large institution with a development company that is across the globe. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences’ Digital Management Services platform brings together collections management, digital asset management, and digital preservation workflows into a single, centralized platform. They will provide an overview of the platform's architecture, which combines Collections Management, Digital Asset Management, and Media Asset Management systems. They will highlight the benefits and challenges of designing automated workflows for preservation and access that accommodate a wide range of both audiovisual and still image assets.

Wednesday March 27, 2019 1:15pm - 2:15pm
Golden State Ballroom II, Banquet Level DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Los Angeles Downtown, 120 S. Los Angeles St., Los Angeles, CA

1:15pm

Session: Framing Places and Identities: Biographies of Photographic Archives and their Environments
CO-ORGANIZERS/CO-MODERATORS:
  • Anne Blecksmith, Head, Reader Services, The Huntington
  • Maureen Burns, Consultant IMAGinED Consulting & Associate, Archivision

PAPERS/PRESENTERS:
  • "Mobility in the Photo-Archive: The Traveling Salerno Ivories"
    Ute Dercks, Deputy Head of Photo Library, Kunsthistorisches Institut in Florenz, Max-Planck-Institut
  • "The Legacy of Max Hutzel and Fote Arte Minore: Roberto Sigismondi and Foto Arte Italiana"
    Tracey Schuster, Head of Permissions and Photo Archive Services, Getty Research Institute
  • "From Craig's List to Digital Objects: The Nine Lives of the Ninomiya Photo Studio Collection"
    Greg Williams, Director, Archives and Special Collections, California State University, Dominguez Hills

Photographs in archives, museums, or special collections lead two distinct lives--a creative life prior to entering a repository and a preservation life afterwards. Ideally, repositories bridge the two lives; however, notions of place and institutional practices have tangible impacts on both identities. Scholars, such as Elizabeth Edwards, have advanced our understanding of the materiality of photographs, their social biographies, and the integral and complex roles photographs and photo archives serve in anthropological and historical contexts. Initiatives such as the Photo Archives conference series, led and organized by Costanza Caraffa at the Kunsthistoriches Institut in Florenz, have expanded upon ideas of the archive of place and conceptualized the photo archive as a dynamic, evolving ecosystem that has the power to shape the identity of its collections, dependent on the archive for survival. Thus the repository itself—whether it is a photo archive, museum, or special collection—assigns a new place and identity to photographs. Moving into a digital space, making the images more readily accessible, complicates issues relating to location and effects institutional practices. Place and identity also influence access and the experience of the collection managers and researchers. This session will explore three repositories that are connected in various ways to their mission, creator, history, and geographical location and will illustrate singular collections as case studies of the two lives—creative and preservation. Presenters will share the histories and challenges of the collections and archives as well as ideas for developing a deepened and more inclusive collective cultural memory.

Wednesday March 27, 2019 1:15pm - 2:15pm
California Ballroom, Banquet Level DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Los Angeles Downtown, 120 S. Los Angeles St., Los Angeles, CA
 
Thursday, March 28
 

9:15am

Session: The Digital Scholarship Pivot: Case Studies in Using VR Skills to Expand Your Professional Reach
ORGANIZER:
  • Betha Whitlow, Curator of Visual Resources, Washington University in Saint Louis

MODERATOR:
  • Brian Shelburne, Head, Digital Scholarship Center, University of Massachusetts Amherst

PRESENTERS:
  • Carolyn Lucarelli, Curator of Visual Resources, The Pennsylvania State University
  • Brian Shelburne, Head, Digital Scholarship Center, University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • Betha Whitlow, Curator of Visual Resources, Washington University in Saint Louis

In a time when academic institutions emphasize the development of tangible and marketable skills alongside traditional humanities training, the so-called “digital humanities” are rapidly gaining traction. Notwithstanding their swift growth, the definition of the field remains mutable and even contested. Are these approaches and methodologies practical, theoretical, or some combination of the two? Despite varying approaches to and understandings of what constitutes the field, trying to enter it can still feel like gaining access to an exclusive club. This session will explore how to become a part of existing digital humanities and scholarship efforts, as well as how to use the skill sets common within our professional community to lead and spearhead original work in and approaches to the field.

Thursday March 28, 2019 9:15am - 10:15am
Golden State Ballroom II, Banquet Level DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Los Angeles Downtown, 120 S. Los Angeles St., Los Angeles, CA

9:15am

Session: The Rights Stuff: Ethical Decision-Making and Image Use in Different Contexts
ORGANIZER:
  • Bonnie Rosenberg, Manager of Rights and Images, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago
  • Sara Schumacher, Architecture Image Librarian, Texas Tech University

MODERATOR:
  • Nazareth Pantaloni, Head, Copyright Program, Indiana University Libraries

PRESENTERS:
  • Maureen Burns, Consultant,  IMAGinED Consulting & Sales Representative, Archivision
  • Bonnie Rosenberg, Manager of Rights and Images, Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago
  • Sara Schumacher, Architecture Image Librarian, Texas Tech University

Ethical decisions surrounding image use are tied to unique contexts, making them difficult to standardize within institutional practices. Different disciplines and professions have their own accepted practices that can include—but often reach outside of—legal considerations. Additionally, the complex landscape of modern technologies and image formats further complicates processes of granting rights and permissions. As managers, stewards, and advocates for visual resources, we feel a responsibility to promote ethical image use universally, and equally want to ensure our own images and image collections are used in ways consistent with our organization’s values. How can we successfully integrate ethical decision-making into existing image use practices? This session will tackle academic and non-academic contexts and discuss strategies for reaching and educating various stakeholders and audiences.

Sponsors
II

Inter-American Institute for Advanced Studies in Cultural History

The Inter-American Institute for Advanced Studies in Cultural History was organized to promote interdisciplinary research and publication by scholars working in Latin-American cultural history. The Institute sponsored several major conferences related to Latin American history and... Read More →


Thursday March 28, 2019 9:15am - 10:15am
California Ballroom, Banquet Level DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Los Angeles Downtown, 120 S. Los Angeles St., Los Angeles, CA

1:00pm

Session: Ed Ruscha's Streets of LA: A lesson in digitizing, organizing and presenting visual information at the Getty
ORGANIZER/MODERATOR:
  • Beth Haas, Digital Imaging Technician,  Princeton University, Firestone Library

PRESENTERS:
  • Nathaniel Deines, Digital Art History Project Manager at the Getty Research Institute
  • Chris Edwards, Imaging and Digital Media Architect at the Getty Research Institute and J. Paul Getty Museum
  • David Newbury, Software and Data Architect at the Getty Research Institute

Artist Ed Ruscha spent decades methodically photographing the streets of LA. This collection, now housed at the Getty, includes miles of 35mm film containing unprecedented cultural information, capturing LA like no one else has. It presents a daunting, but exciting problem in organizing and presenting visual information, which the Getty is taking on with this 3 year project.

Chris Edwards, Imaging and Digital Media Architect at the Getty, will present an overview of the history of this collection and multiple facets of this project including unique digitization workflows, GIS mapping, metadata creation and organization, OCR in images, and presentation website creation. Chris will also discuss the unique challenges to digitizing miles of 35mm film that has been stored on movie film reels. He worked closely with Digital Transitions to solve the problems faced with this unique collection and will discuss creative ways to approach “problem” collections.

Nathaniel Deines, Digital Art History Project Manager at the Getty, oversees the Streets of LA project and will discuss the cataloging and metadata challenges (and victories!) associated with such a rich and far-reaching collection of visual data. He will also present on the GIS aspect of the project and working with Stanford to map the locations shown in Ruscha’s images. David Newbury, Software and Data Architect at the Getty, will discuss how the project will be presented, catering to two different audiences, one scholarly, one public. The scholarly website will include finding aids and presentation software that allows the viewer to scroll through the reels of film. The public interface will be a space to show off this amazing collection and some new technology produced at the Getty.

This in-depth look at a far reaching, culturally important project will offer insights into the many aspects of digitizing, organizing and presenting a unique collection and give attendees a chance to think outside the box in relation to their own collections.

Endorsed by the VRA Education Committee. 

Sponsors
avatar for vrcHost LLC

vrcHost LLC

We specialize in installation, integration, customization, and feature development for the Madison Digital Image Database (MDID) project - an open source digital content management system used at hundreds of institutions worldwide for teaching and scholarship in the visual arts.


Thursday March 28, 2019 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Golden State Ballroom I, Banquet Level DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Los Angeles Downtown, 120 S. Los Angeles St., Los Angeles, CA

5:00pm

VREPS Session: Stories from the Start
ORGANIZERS/MODERATORS:
  • Chelsea Stone, Photo Research and Permissions Librarian, History Colorado Center
  • Kendra Werst, Assistant Visual Resources Curator, Williams College

PRESENTERS:
  • Julia Murphy, Digital Asset Manager, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
  • John Trendler, Curator of Visual Resources, Scripps College
  • Betha Whitlow, Curator of Visual Resources, Washington University in Saint Louis

Have questions about starting out in the Visual Resources field? Interested in hearing other VRA members’ backstories? Join VREPS for a informal conversation with experienced professionals. Speakers will share stories from the beginning years of their career and discuss the difficulties they faced. An open discussion will follow, allowing all attendees to ask questions.  

Speakers:
Julia Murphy is the Digital Asset Manager at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. Julia works to make Hirshhorn’s permanent collection more accessible to staff, researchers, and the public through photographic documentation. She oversees all images of the museum’s permanent collection, the photo archives of the museum’s history, and manages new photography of objects and exhibitions. Julia is also responsible for fulfilling all rights and reproductions requests for Hirshhorn’s object photography.  She trains and mentors interns and volunteers who work with the digitization efforts of the photo archives. Julia joined the Hirshhorn as a contractor in 2013 and became a full-time employee in 2016. She received a Masters in Library Science with a concentration in Archives from the University of Maryland, College Park, in 2014. Prior to working at the Hirshhorn, Julia worked at the National Museum of African Art, CNN, and the White House.

John Trendler is the Curator of Visual Resources at Scripps College in Claremont, California. John graduated from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and attended the New York Studio Program where he focused on abstract painting. John has given talks on technology and professional issues at various conferences, including the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Arts Education, The College Art Association, The Art Libraries Society of North America and of course the Visual Resources Association. John has served as the Secretary and Chair of the Visual Resources Association’s Southern California Chapter as well as the VRA’s Public Relations and Communications Officer between 2012 - 2016.

Betha Whitlow is the Curator of Visual Resources at Washington University in Saint Louis (WUSTL). Her position emphasizes digital curation, the development and use of technology in pedagogy, instruction in visual literacy, and forwarding digital initiatives, trend forecasting, and advising in the adoption and use of a variety of software and other technologies. She is also a lecturer and instructor of record for The Digital Art Historian, a graduate-level course at WUSTL, and currently serves as chair of the Danforth Staff Council, also at WUSTL. Her research and professional interests include the digital campus, design thinking and innovation, instruction, and management strategies, and are reflected her numerous conference and professional talks. She has served as the Visual Resources Association Vice President, co-chair of the VRA Strategic Plan Task Force, Chair of the VRA Education Committee, Chair of the VRA Publishing Advisory Group, Chair of the ARLIS/NA-VRA Summer Educational Institute, and on the Visual Resources Association Foundation Board of Directors, for which she helped developed the VRAF Regional Workshop program. She is the current co-chair of the VRA Identity Task Force, and the 2018 recipient of the Visual Resources Association's Distinguished Service Award. She is a graduate of Northwestern University, and received her MA in Art History from Washington University in Saint Louis.

Thursday March 28, 2019 5:00pm - 6:00pm
Golden State Ballroom II, Banquet Level DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Los Angeles Downtown, 120 S. Los Angeles St., Los Angeles, CA